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YOUR WEEKLY GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL EVENTS
AT UCSB

March 11- March 19, 2017  (last events of Winter Quarter)

1.  Middle East Ensemble - Winter concert (performance)
    Saturday, March 11 / 7:30 p.m. / UCSB Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

2.  The Paris Agreement in Climate Change is in Force — What Now? (Bren Seminar)
    Monday, March 13 / 11:30-12:30 / Bren Hall 1414 (free)

3.  Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States (author talk)
    Monday, March 13 / 5:00 p.m. / McCune Conference Room, HSSB 6020 (free)
    

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1.  Middle East Ensemble - Winter concert (performance)
    Saturday, March 11 / 7:30 p.m. / UCSB Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

We are excited to present a great variety of music and dance from throughout the Middle East. UCSB Persian music lecturer, Bahram Osqueezadeh, will lead the Ensemble in a Kurdish song and a Persian instrumental composition and Temmo Korisheli will perform two classic Arab songs including in-Nahr al-Khalid by Muhammad ‘Abd al-Wahhab.

We are also excited to present an extended set of Sabah Fakhri songs from Aleppo, Syria; two songs by the Lebanese superstar, Fairuz, featuring vocalist Gabriela Quintana-García; and two songs by the beloved Greek singer Roza Eskenazy, featuring vocalist Melanie Hutton.  We will also feature three instrumental soloists: Gus Novak on drum, Brandon Langford on nay (flute), and Ben Seilhamer on oud (lute).

As always, the Ensemble's Dance Company will perform a wonderful variety of dances, including dances from Kuwaiti/Gulf, Lebanese, Persian, and Turkish cultures, with choreographies by Cris! Basimah, Laurel Victoria Gray, and Alexandra King.

Tickets:  $15 General, $5 UCSB students
For flyer and ticket information http://www.cmes.ucsb.edu/

2.  The Paris Agreement in Climate Change is in Force — What Now? (Bren Seminar)
    Monday, March 13 / 11:30-12:30 / Bren Hall 1414 (free)

Christina Voigt (Professor of Law, University of Oslo)

"As a prominent professor at the University of Oslo and the legal advisor to the Norwegian delegation to the international climate negotiations, Christina has a deep understanding of the relationship between the concerns of analysts and practitioners." — Oran Young, Emeritus Faculty Host

The Paris Agreement entered into force with record-breaking speed on November 4th, 2016, less than a year after its adoption. In this talk, Professor Christina Voigt will explain some of the reasons for this rapid entry into force, as well as the consequences of it. She will also give a snapshot of the UN climate negotiations after the latest summit in Marrakesh in November 2016, and discuss expectations for the future development of the international climate regime.

For BIO and details http://www.bren.ucsb.edu/christina_voigt.htm

3.  Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States (author talk)
    Monday, March 13 / 5:00 p.m. / McCune Conference Room, HSSB 6020 (free)

A Talk by Zachary Lockman (New York University)

Area studies is often simplistically depicted as little more than a Cold War form of knowledge, but its emergence as a component of the postwar American academic scene was in fact propelled and shaped by visions, exigencies and contingencies that were not initially or exclusively about the needs of the national security state. Zachary Lockman’s 2016 book Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States draws on extensive archival research to offer a different perspective on the origins and trajectory of area studies in the United States and to explore how the field of Middle East studies in the United States was actually built. The book’s focus is not on intellectual paradigms or scholarly output but rather on funding decisions and their rationales, efforts to elaborate a distinctive theory and method for area studies, the anxieties these efforts generated for Middle East studies, and the unanticipated consequences of building these new academic fields.

For Flyer and details http://www.cmes.ucsb.edu/