Passport

Passport logo

YOUR WEEKLY GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL EVENTS
AT UCSB

June 2 - June 10, 2018

END OF SPRING QUARTER - We'll be back in September!!

 
1.  Amar Akbar Anthony (film screening & panel discussion)
Saturday, June 2 / 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. / UCSB Pollock Theater (free w/reservation)
 
2.  UCSB Middle East Ensemble - Spring Concert
Saturday, June 2 / 7:30 p.m. / UCSB Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
 
3.  Bring Your Own Everything:  Zero Waste Shopping for Reducing Plastic Pollution (BREN Seminar)
Monday, June 4 / 11:00 - 12:00 / Bren Hall 1414 (free)
 
4.  Shared Imagination in the Morning Greetings of Villagers: Implications for Human Evolution (talk)
Monday, June 4 / 4:00 p.m. / McCune Conference Center, HSSB 6020 (free)
 
5.  "I  Am Fragile and Small": Versions of Masculinity in Soviet Unofficial Poetics (talk)
Tuesday, June 5 / 4:00-6:00 p.m. / Phelps Hall, room 6206C (free)
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.  Amar Akbar Anthony (film screening & panel discussion)
Saturday, June 2 / 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. / UCSB Pollock Theater (free w/reservation)

Amar Akbar Anthony was a Bollywood blockbuster when it was released in 1977 and has become a classic of Hindi cinema and a touchstone of Indian popular culture. Delighting audiences with its songs and madcap adventures, the film follows the heroics of three Bombay brothers separated in childhood from their parents and one another. Beyond the freewheeling comedy and camp, however, is a potent vision of social harmony, as the three protagonists, each raised in a different religion, discover they are true brothers in the end.

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the authors of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation: William Elison (Religious Studies, UCSB), Christian Lee Novetzke (International Studies, University of Washington) and Andy Rotman (Religion, Smith College). In their co-authored book they offer a sympathetic and layered interpretation of the film’s deeper symbolism, seeing it as a lens for understanding modern India’s experience with secular democracy.

For reservations and details https://www.carseywolf.ucsb.edu/pollock-events/amar-akbar-anthony/

 
 
2.  UCSB Middle East Ensemble - Spring Concert
Saturday, June 2 / 7:30 p.m. / UCSB Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
 
The program will feature Special Guest Besnik Yzeiri (first-year DMA student from Albania specializing in viola), who will lead the Ensemble in his own composition featuring a medley of melodies from Albania, Serbia, Turkey, Greece, and Macedonia. The Ensemble will also present a suite of songs from Iraq, featuring two unique Iraqi rhythms, jurjuna and chobi, Sam Khattar as solo vocalist, and the Ensemble’s chorus. Additionally, Hala Abdul-Baki will present a famous 1944 song by the Syrian-Egyptian singer, Asmahan; Andrea Fishman will present a Sephardic song from Greece; the Ensemble as a whole will perform a beloved Moroccan song from the famed group Nass al-Ghiwane; and Eric Ederer, Jim Grippo, Fred Nadis, and others will present instrumental solos.
 
As always, the Ensemble's Dance Company will perform a wonderful variety of dances, from Armenian, Egyptian, Lebanese, and Turkish cultures, with solo vocals by Sam Khattar and Varduhi Sargsyan and choreographies by Cris! Basimah, Ahmet Luleci, and Jatila van der Veen. Finally, Cris! Basimah, the Director of the Ensemble's Dance Company, will present a rousing solo dance finale.
 
Tickets:  $15 General, $10 non-UCSB students, $5 UCSB students, FREE Children under 12
 
 
3.  Bring Your Own Everything:  Zero Waste Shopping for Reducing Plastic Pollution (BREN Seminar)
Monday, June 4 / 11:00 - 12:00 / Bren Hall 1414 (free)
 
Every year, North Americans send 50 million tons of food and food packaging waste to landfill, accounting for 45% of all municipal waste.
Brianne and Alison share their story of making the
leap from academia to entrepreneurship to tackle the plastic pollution problem at the source. Their
Vancouver-based package-free grocery store, Nada, has fostered nationwide interest in the zero waste
movement and they have received international praise for their food systems work. A combination of
retail, tech, supply chain innovation, and grassroots community building has allowed them to develop
a customer base in the thousands, diverting more than 100,000 containers from landfill every year and
sparking a city-wide movement to reduce single-use plastics. Food and packaging waste can seem like
an inescapable part of modern-day life, yet zero-waste grocery shopping has been growing globally.
Brianne and Alison delve into the complexities of a waste-free supply chain and the challenges faced
with the logistics of package-free shopping, including accessibility and consumer behavior change. As
advocates for everyday small actions to drive positive change, they share tips for living a less wasteful
lifestyle — ultimately keeping plastics out of the ocean and contributing to a more just food system.
 
 
 
4.  Shared Imagination in the Morning Greetings of Villagers: Implications for Human Evolution (talk)
Monday, June 4 / 4:00 p.m. / McCune Conference Center, HSSB 6020 (free)
 
Maurice Bloch is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the London School of Economics.  He carried out fieldwork in Madagascar and other parts of the world with a particular interest in topics such as imagination, ritual, cultural transmission, and the nature of the social among humans and other animals.  As a cultural anthropologist, he has been a prominent advocate for rebuilding th elinks between the cognitive sciences and anthropology.
 
 
5.  "I  Am Fragile and Small": Versions of Masculinity in Soviet Unofficial Poetics (talk)
Tuesday, June 5 / 4:00-6:00 p.m. / Phelps Hall, room 6206C (free)
 
In this talk, Ainsley Morse will examine the presentation of masculinity (usually that of the lyric speaker) in the work of several unofficial poets of the late Soviet period. As an institution, unofficial literature occupied a powerless position vis-a-vis officially published literature; yet, unofficial poets drew on the tradition of predecessors including Vladimir Mayakovsky and Daniil Kharms to construct a lyric presence that combined exaggerated weakness (“loserdom”) with the implicit power of the voice and word. Ainsley Morse is a scholar, teacher and translator of Russian and former Yugoslav literatures. Her research focuses on the literature and culture of the post-war Soviet period, particularly unofficial or “underground” poetry, as well as the avant-garde and children’s literature. Her Ph.D. is from Harvard University. She has taught lately at Dartmouth College and UCSD; in 2018-19 she will be a visiting professor at Pomona College.