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YOUR WEEKLY GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL EVENTS
AT UCSB

June 3 - 11, 2017 (plus conference June 19/20)

(We'll be back in September with fall Events!)

1.  The UCSB Middle East Ensemble - Spring concert (performance)
    Saturday, June 3 / 7:30 p.m. / Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB

2.  The People is the Source of all Power: Ambiguities in Modern Islamic Political Theory (talk)
    Monday, June 5 / 5:00 p.m. / HSSB, room 4080 (free)

3.  Embodying the Borderland: Nakamura Sueko as Runaway Woman and Pirate Queen (talk)
    Wednesday, June 7 / 4:00 p.m. / SSMS, room 2135 (free)

4.  Conference:  Repositioning Shugendō: New Research Directions on Japanese Mountain Religions
    Monday & Tuesday, June 19-20 / McCune Conference Room, HSSB 6020
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1.  The UCSB Middle East Ensemble - Spring concert (performance)
    Saturday, June 3 / 7:30 p.m. / Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB

We are excited to present a great variety of music and dance from throughout the Middle East.  UCSB Persian music lecturer, Bahram Osqueezadeh, will perform a solo on the santur (the Persian hammered dulcimer).  Nick Ragheb and Nader Mansi, Cantor at Coptic churches in Simi Valley and Oxnard, will lead the Ensemble in a Coptic hymn for Palm Sunday.  Sarah Salim will perform a song by the Egyptian superstar singer Umm Kulthum (d. 1975).  Maz Kavandish will lead the ensemble in two Persian songs;  Andrea Fishman will perform a Sephardic song from Morocco; and Sam Khattar will perform a song by the Egyptian singer/composer Sayyid Darwish (d.1923) popularized by Syrian singer Sabah Fakhri (b.1933).  

For tickets and details http://www.cmes.ucsb.edu/

2.  The People is the Source of all Power: Ambiguities in Modern Islamic Political Theory (talk)
    Monday, June 5 / 5:00 p.m. / HSSB, room 4080 (free)

It is a standard trope of contemporary Islamic political theory that “the people is the source of all political authority” (al-shaʿb masdar al-sulutāt). This has become such a commonplace in modern Islamist discourse than even Salafi parties that contest elections include this in their manifestos. The ubiquity of the professed commitment to the people being the source of all political authority in modern (Sunni) Islamic political thought thus seems to indicate a potentially profound commitment to democratic self-rule, certainly more profound than more traditional ideas that governance in Islam must incorporate some kind of consultation (shūrā) between the ruler and representatives of the people. However, how deep can any Islamic commitment to fully autonomous popular legislation be? Is a people permitted to authorize any forms of government whatsoever, or are there divinely revealed constraints on both the kinds of law that can be authorized and the kinds of offices or institutions that a people may authorize? If Islam retains its close association with a pre-political, revealed, and commanded law (even if that law is open-ended and subject to interpretation and extension), it seems difficult to imagine how any Muslim community is radically free to create its own legal and political institutions.

For BIO and flyer http://www.cmes.ucsb.edu/events/March%20Flyer.pdf

3.  Embodying the Borderland: Nakamura Sueko as Runaway Woman and Pirate Queen (talk)
    Wednesday, June 7 / 4:00 p.m. / SSMS, room 2135 (free)

David R. Ambaras (History, North Carolina State University)

David R. Ambaras is a scholar of late nineteenth and early twentieth century Japanese history. His first book, Bad Youth: Juvenile Delinquency and the Politics of Everyday Life in Japan (University of California, 2005), examined the development of the modern Japanese state through the policing of urban youth. His second book project, from which this talk is drawn, examines the transgressive mobilities of prostitutes, peddlers, and other marginalized individuals who circulated between China and Japan under the Japanese Empire. Ambaras is currently Associate Professor of History at North Carolina State University and a founding member of the Triangle Center for Japanese Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

For flyer and details http://www.ihc.ucsb.edu/embodying-the-borderland/

4.  Conference:  Repositioning Shugendō: New Research Directions on Japanese Mountain Religions
    Monday & Tuesday, June 19-20 / McCune Conference Room, HSSB 6020

This conference aims at reconsidering the study of Shugendō through a historico-religious perspective, in contrast with the currently dominant ethnological approach. The participants will discuss doctrinal and practical interactions between Shugendō and other religious traditions such as Onmyōdō (“Way of Yin and Yang”), Shintō, and Esoteric Buddhism, in order to situate Shugendō within the broader Japanese religious mindscape. In particular, the influence of Shugendō not only in relation to sacred mountains (as it is mostly done), but also to rural areas and urban centers will be addressed. Moreover, the nature of “mountain religion” in general shall be problematized as a complex set of diverse phenomena involving not only Shugendō specialists, but also members of other religious traditions and even non- affiliated laypeople. The ultimate objective of the conference is to lead to a thorough reconfiguration of the sacred cultural geography of Shugendō. In detail, papers will focus on the following themes: (i) Visual, literary, and artistic strategies related to En no Gyōja, the legendary founder of Shugendō, as mechanisms of reinvention of the past and establishment of authority through texts, images, and symbols; (ii) sacred mountains located in peripheral areas such as Togakushi and Yudono, or Mt. Fuji (which was the place of practice for non-Shugendō mountain ascetics as well); (iii) networks involving Shugendō practitioners and other religious figures such as itinerant ascetics or lay members of religious confraternities (kō), as a way to bring to the fore the complex systems of alliances, competitions, and collaborations that always characterized Shugendō institutions.

Conference WEB SITE http://www.eastasian.ucsb.edu/shugendo/