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YOUR WEEKLY GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL EVENTS
AT UCSB

January 19 - January 27, 2019

 Welcome back to UCSB and Winter Quarter Events!

 
 
1.  Martin Luther King Jr. Day (Holiday - campus is closed)
Monday, January 21st
 
2.  Exiled: Loss and Resilience Among Refugee and Forcibly Displaced Youth and Communities (talk)
Tuesday, January 22 / 4:00-6:00 p.m. / Pacific View Room, UCSB Library (free)
 
3.  An Evening with Madeleine Albright64th U.S. Secretary of State
Tuesday, January 22 / 7:30 p.m. / Granada Theatre in downtown Santa Barbara
 
4.  The Alif Series: In Conversation With The Dead Zulfikar Ali Bhutto //Faluda Islam\\ (performance)
Tuesday, January 22 / 7:30 p.m. / MultiCultural Center Theater (free)
 
5.  Mariachi Las Olas de SB (performance)
Wednesday, January 23 / 12:00 noon / UCSB Music Bowl (free)
 
6.  UCSB Reads: The Best We Could Do: Telling and Re-telling the Stories of Asian America (panel discussion)
Wednesday, January 23 / 4:00-6:00 p.m. / Library Instruction & Training 1312 UCSB Library (free)
 
7.  Quote Unquote Collective (performance)
Wednesday, January 23 / 8:00 p.m. / UCSB Campbell Hall
 
8. The Struggle to Abolish Environmental Racism - Pam Tau Lee (Lecture - Race Matters Series)
Thursday, January 24 / 6:00 p.m. / MultiCultural Center Theater (free)
 
9.  Beatles Revolutions: Let It Be (film screening & discussion)
Thursday, January 24 / 7:00-9:15 p.m. / UCSB Pollock Theater (SOLD OUT)
 
10.  Leonidas Kavakos, violin (performance)
Friday, January 25 / 7:00 p.m. / UCSB Campbell Hall
 
11.  Ismail Lumanovski and Inspector Gadje Balkan Brass (performance)
Friday, January 25 / 7:30 p.m. / MultiCultural Center Theater
 
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1.  Martin Luther King Jr. Day (Holiday - campus is closed)
Monday, January 21st
 
 
2.  Exiled: Loss and Resilience Among Refugee and Forcibly Displaced Youth and Communities (talk)
Tuesday, January 22 / 4:00-6:00 p.m. / Pacific View Room, UCSB Library (free)
 
Mass migration and forced displacement of communities due to disruptions by violence, climate change, and economic and political instability, have heralded an era of global movement that has reached crisis levels. Approximately half of the world’s refugees are youth under the age of eighteen. The Convention on the Rights of the Child is the most widely ratified international human rights treaty in history, guaranteeing children the rights to education, health, protection, dignity, and non-discrimination, along with other basic human rights. Yet, many refugee children and adolescents face statelessness, and are obstructed from access to education. Moreover, they are likely to face multiple and cumulative adversities that can lead to significant and long-term negative outcomes. Dr. Kia-Keating’s talk will draw from the contributions of psychological research in clinical and prevention sciences to the dialogue on refugee and forcibly displaced youth and communities resettled in the United States. She will highlight research on resilience and the benefits of ‘building longer tables, not taller fences.’
 
 
 
3.  An Evening with Madeleine Albright,  64th U.S. Secretary of State
Tuesday, January 22 / 7:30 p.m. / Granada Theatre in downtown Santa Barbara
 
“[Albright’s] contribution to the cultivation of democracy as a stateswoman and private citizen is unparalleled.” The New York Times

Madeleine K. Albright is a professor, author, diplomat and businesswoman who served as the 64th Secretary of State of the United States. In 1997, she was named the first female Secretary of State and became, at that time, the highest ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government. From 1993 to 1997, Dr. Albright served as the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations and was a member of the President’s Cabinet. Author of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller, Fascism: A Warning, Albright’s talk and moderated Q&A will draw on her experiences as a child in war-torn Europe and her distinguished career as a diplomat to address lessons we must understand and questions we must answer if we are to avoid repeating tragic errors of the past.

 
Tickets:  $39-$89 General Public, $20 Students
 
 
4.  The Alif Series: In Conversation With The Dead Zulfikar Ali Bhutto //Faluda Islam\\ (performance)
Tuesday, January 22 / 7:30 p.m. / MultiCultural Center Theater (free)
 
Zulfikar Ali Bhutto //Faluda Islam\\ is an artist, performer, zombie drag queen, and curator of mixed Pakistani, Lebanese, and Iranian descent. His work explores complex identities formed by centuries of colonialism and exacerbated by contemporary international politics. Bhutto unpacks the intersections of queerness and Islam and how it exists in a constant liminal and non-aligned space.  Faluda Islam is less a drag queen and more a drag comrade, she is more "extra" than terrestrial, and more dead than alive. She has traveled through time and space and been brought back to life through wifi technology from a gory encounter with American allied troops in Libya. As a time traveller and living corpse, she has many powers including being able to speak to the dead, as she herself comes back to life she will also resurrect, if only for a brief period, martyrs, comrades, allies, and family who she must engage in conversation with to understand her own struggle.
 
MultiCultural Center Winter 2019 events  http://mcc.sa.ucsb.edu/events/winter-2019
 
 
5.  Mariachi Las Olas de SB (performance)
Wednesday, January 23 / 12:00 noon / UCSB Music Bowl (free)
 
Led by Juan Zaragoza, Mariachi Las Olas de SB presents a program featuring music that celebrates the flora and fauna found in songs from Latin American cultures. For example, the moon, especially full moons, is a key protagonist in popular songs in Mexican, Mexican-American, and some Latin American cultures. Sones and corridos about cows, bulls, and horses are also an important part of the canon or collection of mariachi songs. The group will also present boleros and other mariachi favorites. 
 
This is part of the Winter 2019 World Music Series presented by the Ethnomusicology Program and the MultiCultural Center every Wednesday at noon.  For more information, contact the MultiCultural Center at 893-8411.  In case of rain, the event will be held in the Music Room 1145 in the Music Building.
 
 
 
6.  UCSB Reads: The Best We Could Do: Telling and Re-telling the Stories of Asian America (panel discussion)
Wednesday, January 23 / 4:00-6:00 p.m. / Library Instruction & Training 1312 UCSB Library (free)
 
A panel discussion with erin Khue Ninh, Sameer Pandya, Eleanor Ty, and Xiaojian Zhao

Four panelists from UCSB Department of Asian American Studies will discuss the UCSB Reads 2019 book The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui and its themes from a variety of perspectives.

A UCSB Reads 2019 event.

https://www.ihc.ucsb.edu/event/ucsb-reads-the-best-we-could-do-telling-a...

 
7.  Quote Unquote Collective (performance)
Wednesday, January 23 / 8:00 p.m. / UCSB Campbell Hall

West Coast Premiere of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe Hit  Mouthpiece
Created and Performed by Amy Nostbakken and Norah Sadava

“A smart show, beautifully put together and performed, and one that speaks up for all the women who daily bite their tongues.” The Guardian (U.K.)

A two-woman theatrical performance acclaimed for its raw honesty and insightful portrayal of womanhood, Mouthpiece follows a woman over the course of a day as she struggles to find her voice. Winner of multiple awards at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, a Dora Award and Best New Canadian Play at the Toronto Theatre Critics Awards, the engrossing work is co-created and performed by the Toronto-based Quote Unquote Collective.

 
Tickets:  $20-$35 General Public, Free for all students
 
 
8. The Struggle to Abolish Environmental Racism - Pam Tau Lee (Lecture - Race Matters Series)
Thursday, January 24 / 6:00 p.m. / MultiCultural Center Theater (free)
 
This talk will highlight the Asian radical imaginings of environmental justice from the homeland to the frontlines. Rooted in 50 years of Asian American radical activism and environmental justice organizing, Pam Tau Lee addresses the question: “Can an Asian radical perspective contribute toward achieving environmental justice?” Pam Tau Lee is a veteran Asian American organizer and activist.  She was involved in the San Francisco Asian American struggles of the 1960s-70s and helped found both the Chinese Progressive Association and the Asian Pacific Environmental Network. Pam has worked with some of the most important people in the environmental justice movement to insist that the movement focuses on environmental racism, Indigenous struggles, and include the voices and leadership of the most vulnerable. 
 
MultiCultural Center Winter 2019 events  http://mcc.sa.ucsb.edu/events/winter-2019
 
 
9.  Beatles Revolutions: Let It Be (film screening & discussion)
Thursday, January 24 / 7:00-9:15 p.m. / UCSB Pollock Theater (SOLD OUT)

Director Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s documentary Let It Be (1970) was originally intended to showcase the band’s creative process and to represent a return to form during a time when creative and interpersonal disagreement weighed heavily on the group. Instead, the film stands as an elegy for the Beatles, immortalizing the tensions between them, as well as the virtuosity of their iconic final rooftop performance.

Musician and producer Alan Parsons will join moderator David Novak (Music, UCSB) for a post-screening discussion.

SOLD OUT: See Web Site for information
 
 
10.  Leonidas Kavakos, violin (performance)
Friday, January 25 / 7:00 p.m. / UCSB Campbell Hall
 
“Kavakos’ tone has the character of striking high-grade silver sinew, ever beautiful, graceful and unbreakable.” – Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times

Leonidas Kavakos, a “formidable violinist” (The New York Times) and “prodigious talent, with an astonishing technique” (The Guardian, U.K.) returns to Santa Barbara after his enthralling 2017 performance with pianist Yuja Wang. A musician’s musician, Kavakos' virtuosity will be on full display here in a program highlighting his “shining and sweet tone… but also taut muscularity and a sense of overall structure” (NPR).

Program
Beethoven: Violin Sonata No. 4, op. 23
Prokofiev: Violin Sonata No. 1, op. 80
Bartók: Rhapsody No. 1, Sz. 87
Enescu: Violin Sonata No. 3, op. 25

 
Tickets:  $25 - $40 General Public, $10 UCSB Students
 
 
11.  Ismail Lumanovski and Inspector Gadje Balkan Brass (performance)
Friday, January 25 / 7:30 p.m. / MultiCultural Center Theater
 
Ismail Lumanovski (mastermind of New York Gypsy All-Stars) and Inspector Gadje released their debut album Live At Kafana Balkan in March 2017. There’s been a buzz from the start for this pairing, which consistently draws sold out crowds propelled by high energy, soaring, funky, dirty, ecstatic brass. The New York Times called Lumanovski a "brilliant, fearless young clarinetist, “ and the San Francisco Chronicle calls Gadje "an instant party atmosphere," so you can imagine the virtuosity and sway this dynamic project inspires. While Lumanovski and Inspector Gadje each stand tall as performers in their own right, together they have a certain synergy and magic that take their music to new heights. Tight and adventurous arrangements, grooves that get under the skin and into the feet, and epic solos come together for music that touches the heart, stirs the soul, and moves the body.
 
Tickets:  $5 for UCSB students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission
MultiCultural Center Winter 2019 events  http://mcc.sa.ucsb.edu/events/winter-2019